Bauhaus Rules

Presented by Jim Moir (aka Vic Reeves), Bauhaus Rules brings the radical principles of the Bauhaus to a new generation, to discover if the school’s groundbreaking approach to training artists still holds its power 100 years on.

Over the course of a week, six Central St Martins graduates - across fine art, fashion, graphic design and architecture - are challenged each day to create a new work of art, design or performance, sticking strictly to rules inspired by the artists who taught at the Bauhaus. 

Founded in 1919 by architect Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus is best known for its striking modernist architecture, attention-grabbing typography and stylish form-meets-function design. But beneath all this was a pioneering art school that revolutionised the way we teach art - placing collaboration, experimentation with materials and the flouting of art convention at centre stage.

From Oskar Schlemmer, the cutting-edge costume designer, to Wasilly Kandinsky, one of the early pioneers of abstract art, the Bauhaus tore up the old rules of art and design and placed radical new ones in their place.

Setting the rules in this unique experiment are key figures from today’s worlds of art and design, who have been influenced by the Bauhaus in their own work - from artists David Bachelor and Ian Whittlesea to graphic designer Neville Brody.

During this transformational week, the Central Saint Martin’s graduates experience esoteric breathing exercises, are given a taste of a rather potent garlic mush that was the hallmark of the Bauhaus canteen, and are challenged to reinterpret a legendary Bauhaus party with costumes and room decoration crafted out of metallic objects. The experience challenges their preconceptions not only of the Bauhaus, but of how to make art.

Bauhaus Rules (1x60') is a BBC Studios production and was commissioned for BBC Arts and BBC Four by Emma Cahusac. Janet Lee is the Executive Producer for BBC Studios and Simon Lloyd is the Director and Producer.

www.bbc.co.uk










 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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